Cardiology

Cardiology

Lessons

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major public health concern, and diet is believed to play an important role in mediating CVD risk. This webinar will discuss the history and impact of scientific research on nutrition recommendations for a healthy heart and will share practical tips for developing nutrition strategies for treating dyslipidemia today.

As a health professional, you are in a unique position to educate Americans on the importance of diet and nutrition for better health. By providing perspectives on the latest scientific evidence, you can help people weigh the risks and benefits of individual food choices when it comes to reducing CVD risk and improving overall health

Activities Included:

CME Information

Content

Quiz

Evaluation

Standard: Free
0.5 hours | ACCME, ANCC

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Research shows that smoking is common among many patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and is an important modifiable risk factor for recurrent cardiac events. Studies show that smoking cessation after AMI decreases the risk of recurrent heart attacks and mortality by 30% to 50%. Efforts to improve smoking cessation after AMI have become important performance measures throughout the United States, but many smokers still will not quit their habit even after suffering an AMI. Most patient education strategies on smoking cessation focus on the risks from continuing to smoke, but patients may be concerned that quitting will worsen their quality of life. These concerns may lower patients’ motivation and success with quitting. Further compounding the issue is that patients recovering from heart attacks often receive little information about the potential effect of smoking cessation on angina and quality of life. It is well known that smoking after AMI increases risks for recurrent heart attacks and mortality, but few studies have looked at how smoking relates to health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in cardiac patients. Understanding the link between smoking cessation and HRQOL could have important implications for smoking prevention and how we treat patients who actively smoke at the time of their AMI. This information may also improve how clinicians counsel patients to quit smoking after their AMI.

Activities Included:

CME Information

Content

Quiz

Evaluation

Standard: Free

0.5 hours | ACCME, ANCC

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Recent reports have shown that coronary heart disease (CHD) continues to be a leading cause of death among Americans despite a remarkable decline in cardiovascular deaths related to the disease over the past several decades. CHD mortality rates fell by as much as 52% in men and 49% in women between 1980 and 2002, according to some research. However, other data suggests that these beneficial trends may not have been experienced by all demographic groups. A 2007 study showed that there was a dramatic slowing in the average annual rate of decline of CHD mortality among adults aged 35 to 54. Younger women appeared to be a particularly vulnerable patient group in this analysis.

Activities Included:

CME Information

Content

Quiz

Evaluation

Standard: Free