Emergency Medicine

Emergency Medicine

Lessons

0.5 hours | ACCME, ANCC

COURSE DESCRIPTION

According to published research, the elderly have the highest rate of ED use among all adult patient groups. Poor outcomes, such as death or an ICU admission shortly after discharge from the ED, can be catastrophic events. Data on outcomes after elderly patients are discharged from the ED are important patient safety and quality of care issues, but few analyses have investigated the specific risk factors that lead to these events. Previous studies have used clinical data to identify predictors of poor outcomes after discharge from the ED. While this is an important first step in understanding the problem, previous research has been limited. Most studies on this issue do not have follow-up information because the elderly may go to other hospitals or EDs to receive care after they are discharged. Much of the available research lacks direct access to patient records and cannot identify patient and process-of-care characteristics that were inherent to ED encounters.

Activities Included:

CME Information

Content

Quiz

Evaluation

Standard: Free
0.5 hours | ACCME, ANCC

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Since emergency physicians (EPs) have a unique skill set for rapid assessments and stabilization, they are often the most qualified bystanders to act as a “Good Samaritans” by providing such care when it is safe to do so. However, with the exception of Good Samaritan events on airplanes and in schools, little is known about how often or in which locations these events occur. Several organizations have advised EPs to carry an emergency kit in the event of needing to provide emergency care, but recommendations for the content of these kits are largely based on consensus or expert opinion. Many kits focus mostly on airway protection and hemorrhage control. An inventory of commonly used supplies and medications has yet to be established. Oftentimes, stories of EPs providing care outside of their official roles are shared among colleagues, but exploring how often and where these events occur may help improve our preparedness and how we handle these situations in the future.

Activities Included:

CME Information

Content

Quiz

Evaluation

Standard: Free

0.5 hours | ACCME, ANCC

COURSE DESCRIPTION

The estimated number of supplement products has increased significantly over the past 2 decades. Recent reports show that about half of all adults in the United States have reported using at least one dietary supplement in the past month. Post-marketing reporting of adverse events from manufacturers of these supplements is required only for serious adverse events, and voluntary reporting may underestimate the adverse events associated with these products. There has been increasing public attention regarding post-marketing removal of some supplement products, which in turn has led to calls for changes in oversight. Few clinical studies have examined the safety of dietary supplements that are still available on the market, and data are lacking to quantify the frequency of adverse events associated with dietary supplements in the U.S.

Activities Included:

CME Information

Content

Quiz

Evaluation

Standard: Free

0.5 hours | ACCME, ANCC

COURSE DESCRIPTION

According to published research, the use of CT when evaluating adults with blunt trauma injuries has risen dramatically in the past 2 decades. CT can provide clinicians with information about internal injuries, and many trauma centers routinely examine victims of major trauma using head-to-pelvis CT. However, chest CTs do not always provide much additional information if they are completed after a normal chest x-ray. Chest CTs can expose patients to significant radiation doses that may increase their risk of cancer. Costs associated with chest CT are also high for patients, with a single chest CT scan costing as much as $3,800. In addition, performing these scans can consume large amounts of time for both physicians and patients. Considering the potential risks, efforts are needed to reduce the costs and radiation risks of unnecessary blunt trauma imaging.

Activities Included:

CME Information

Content

Quiz

Evaluation

Standard: Free

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Past research on firearm violence among youth populations has primarily been retrospective or has only examined adolescents requiring hospitalization. This can miss many ED patients who do not need to be hospitalized after an assault-related injury. The risk for firearm violence in high-risk youths after treatment for an assault has not been thoroughly studied. This information is critical to informing the development and implementation of evidence-based firearm violence interventions that can be applied to adolescents and young adults who experience assault-related injuries.

Activities Included:

CME Information

Content

Quiz

Evaluation

Standard: Free

0.5 hours | ACCME, ANCC

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Studies show that marginalized populations face greater social inequalities and healthcare disparities, placing them at higher risk for diseases and death. One patient group that is not immune to these disparities is the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community. It’s important for emergency physicians to better understand the disparities and health risks that LGBT patients face in order to communicate more effectively with these individuals. An inherent challenge with treating this patient population is that sexual orientation and gender identity are not always evident. In many cases, patients hide this information from their healthcare providers for fear of discrimination. Compounding the issue is that there are few universal standards that are specifically applicable to LGBT health education. Healthcare providers are often poorly prepared to care for this at-risk population, which in turn can result in distrust and avoidance in seeking prompt medical care.

Activities Included:

CME Information

Content

Quiz

Evaluation

Standard: Free