Guidance on Opioid Prescribing for Patients with Chronic Pain

Guidance on Opioid Prescribing for Patients with Chronic Pain

COURSE DESCRIPTION


Recent estimates show that more than 11% of adults in the United States experience chronic pain, and clinical guidelines indicate that these patients receive appropriate pain treatment only after carefully considering the benefits and risks of drug options. Opioids are commonly prescribed for pain, with about 3% to 4% of U.S. adults being prescribed these agents for long term duration. While these medications can be effective when used for shorter durations, fewer studies have rigorously assessed the long-term benefits of opioids for pain lasting longer than 3 months. Opioid use presents a serious public health risk, with data showing that the number of deaths relating to opioid use quadrupled from 1999 to 2010. In 2013, about 1.9 million people abused or were dependent on prescription opioid pain medications. This has led many clinicians, especially those in primary care, to have increasing concerns about opioid pain medication misuse.

Activities Included:

CME Information

Content

Quiz

Evaluation

Standard: Free

Chronic Pain & Mental Health

Chronic Pain & Mental Health

0.5 hours | ACCME, ANCC
COURSE DESCRIPTION

Chronic pain sufferers frequently report experiencing many comorbidities, including depression, pain catastrophizing, and anxiety, among others. Researchers have suggested that the severity of these comorbidities is related to the degree of pain and pain-related disability. However, few studies have explored the independent effects of depression, anxiety, and pain catastrophizing on pain outcomes over time. Understanding the relative influence of these psychological conditions on pain outcomes is important to help clinicians refine their understanding of how they manage people living with chronic pain.

Activities Included:

CME Information

Content

Quiz

Evaluation

Standard: Free

Initial Opioid Use & Long-Term Risks

Initial Opioid Use & Long-Term Risks


0.5 hours | ACCME, ANCC
COURSE DESCRIPTION

As opioid prescribing has increased over the past two decades, the United States healthcare system has also seen rising rates of overdoses and addiction treatment resulting from misuse and abuse of these drugs. Experts have called for more selective use of opioids, but clinicians are often left wondering how long and how high a dose of opioids can be prescribed before inadvertently promoting long-term use. Greater attention is needed regarding the characteristics of initial and early opioid prescriptions and their association with long-term use. Few data are available to guide initial prescribing for opioid-naïve patients.

Activities Included:

CME Information

Content

Quiz

Evaluation

Standard: Free